☮ a r t m a k i n g ☮

P R A C T I C E + R E F E R E N C E S

sepik river peoples’ (papua new guineau) incredible type of thatched, vaulted building. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sepik

I’ve been thinking a lot about line, with some interesting digressions.

I once saw a group of freshwater eels hunting in the ocean. Or, rather, I saw the paths of the eels in the ripples and water they displaced. They moved just below the surface of the waves in confluence. Their feeding paths were precise and choreographed. They surged, corralled, along the horizontal plane of warmer upper waters but deflected side to side. Lines are movements as well as boundaries.

these are brand new freshwater eels. hatching.

This is the Boston Christian Science Library’s “Mapparium,” a three story tall glass globe of the world that you can walk through. Apparently the acoustics are amazing - from the centre of the bridge, somewhere beneath the north pole, you can barely hear your neighbour, while the voice of someone just entering the globe feels like it’s right beside you. Cool. More info here.

This is the Boston Christian Science Library’s “Mapparium,” a three story tall glass globe of the world that you can walk through. Apparently the acoustics are amazing - from the centre of the bridge, somewhere beneath the north pole, you can barely hear your neighbour, while the voice of someone just entering the globe feels like it’s right beside you. Cool. More info here.

by dennis hlynsky: 


"dark sunset facing south along RT 6"

"This footage was recorded at the Seekonk Speedway in Massachusetts near the RI boarder. Described as extended moment photography the technique is not considered time-lapse film where time is condensed… flowers blooming,fruit rotting, city waking up… that sort of thing. This recording plays at real time speed. The footage is processed to extend the moment captured to show trails of where the animal has been / will be."

(Source: vimeo.com)

‘galaxies forming along filaments, like droplets along the strands of a spider’s web’ 2009 by tomas saraceno
made of elastic ropes 

"argentinian artist tomas saraceno is exhibiting his work ‘galaxies forming along 

filaments, like droplets along the strands of a spider’s web’ as part of the ‘fare mondi’ / 
making worlds / bantin duniyan / 制造世界 / weltenmachen / construire des mondes/
fazer mundos…exhibition.

saraceno’s interest in architectural projects is part of the artist’s ongoing fascination 
with utopian theories and astronomical constellations. his conception of what constitutes
an architectural structure is admirably broad, and his new installation examines how 
the black widow’s gossamer filaments are able to suspend extreme weights through 
the use of complex geometry.”

John Berger, Stone, Gramsci, Architecture

   In John Berger’s short essay on Italian philosopher Antonio Gramsci, How to Live With Stones, Berger uses the natural landscape of Gramsci’s native Sardinia to understand the philosopher’s particular patience in the act of political resistance. It is well known that Gramsci spent nearly 10 years of his thinking, adult life in jail; during that time he produced what is now his most famous text, the Prison Notebooks. Berger states that Gramsci’s “lack of dogma came from a kind of patience,” and that to have such patience illustrated that “hope is a long affair.” Gramsci’s sense of time was unique, shaped by the Sardinian landscape, and equipped him with a thoughtfulness and patience in the face of injustice.

    Sardinians sought refuge from waves of invaders in the in rocky mountains and caves. Heavy stone walls separate Sardinian farm pastures. Tall, dry stone watchtowers called nuraghi and symbolic upright stones guard the island. Hollowed out rock-pediments serve as houses of the dead. Stone is a provider and protector; the literal and culturally metaphoric foundation of Sardinia. Berger writes: “stones propose another sense of time, whereby the past, the deep past of the planet, proffers a meager yet massive support to human acts of resistance, as if the veins of metal in the rock led to our veins of blood.”

   One might not be able to resist interpreting this relationship with stone as architectural. Architecture, in study and practice, requires the same patience and hope. It literally is building with stone, materially a slow and weighted process. Good architecture is slow enough to be thoughtful. Since retiring hardly seems to be a thing architects do; maybe sometimes it takes patience - years - to produce good work. Here’s to Gramsci’s sense of optimism, and to the difficulty of patience in the pursuit of change and good work.

 

I saw this photo yesterday at the Alex Colville exhibit at the AGO. Something about it is so striking. On the right is the Colville, looking out at his wife of 70 years, and beyond that, ocean. His wife, Rhoda, is the blonde figure that appears in his paintings. This image was probably taken in Nova Scotia, where they lived most of their lives. I find this image really meaningful.

I saw this photo yesterday at the Alex Colville exhibit at the AGO. Something about it is so striking. On the right is the Colville, looking out at his wife of 70 years, and beyond that, ocean. His wife, Rhoda, is the blonde figure that appears in his paintings. This image was probably taken in Nova Scotia, where they lived most of their lives. I find this image really meaningful.

via apartmenttherapy:

"George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) worked for the last 20 years of his life in a remarkably sophisticated writer’s hut on his property in St. Albans, Hertfordshire. Besides having electricity, a telephone, and a buzzer system, the hut’s most notable feature was that it was built on a turntable, which enabled Shaw to push it to follow the sun."

And even more drool-worthy, other famous writing huts including Henry David Thoreau’s at Walden, omg…

The first episode of Al Jazeera’s new series Rebel Architecture features Santiago Cirugeda, “a subversive architect from Seville who has dedicated his career to reclaiming urban spaces for the public.” In this episode we see a few projects, both legal and illegal, ugly and …promising, that Cirugeda and other architects / volunteers / artists / kids build. The episode is really well done, and such a relevant insight into the creative solutions and attitudes to the economic crisis in Spain. As one architect puts it, “Our projects are portrayed as the solution to the financial crisis, but we have to be clear on our position. This isn’t just a quick fix for the crisis but an alternative model.” Some really cool ideas in here.

The first episode of Al Jazeera’s new series Rebel Architecture features Santiago Cirugeda, “a subversive architect from Seville who has dedicated his career to reclaiming urban spaces for the public.” In this episode we see a few projects, both legal and illegal, ugly and …promising, that Cirugeda and other architects / volunteers / artists / kids build. The episode is really well done, and such a relevant insight into the creative solutions and attitudes to the economic crisis in Spain. As one architect puts it, “Our projects are portrayed as the solution to the financial crisis, but we have to be clear on our position. This isn’t just a quick fix for the crisis but an alternative model.” Some really cool ideas in here.

st. margaret’s bay, nova scotia.

self-controlled robots let you roam tate britain after dark
from designboom.com: ”…broadcasting live from tate britain beginning tonight, the public will be able to navigate the museum’s collection of historic art using self-controlled robots, which can roam through the gallery spaces and exhibition halls. …robots designed for late night travel can be guided and controlled by people all over the world through a web portal. every few minutes the robots choose new operators to drive them through galleries and exhibition spaces, designed and developed specifically for this task. navigating the site can be enacted with on-screen buttons or a keyboard’s arrows, which directs their motion either forwards or backwards. they can also look up and down, scanning the artworks on display. the robots have been created in collaboration with RAL space (working alongside the UK space agency)..” 

self-controlled robots let you roam tate britain after dark

from designboom.com: ”…broadcasting live from tate britain beginning tonight, the public will be able to navigate the museum’s collection of historic art using self-controlled robots, which can roam through the gallery spaces and exhibition halls. …robots designed for late night travel can be guided and controlled by people all over the world through a web portal. every few minutes the robots choose new operators to drive them through galleries and exhibition spaces, designed and developed specifically for this task. navigating the site can be enacted with on-screen buttons or a keyboard’s arrows, which directs their motion either forwards or backwards. they can also look up and down, scanning the artworks on display. the robots have been created in collaboration with RAL space (working alongside the UK space agency)..” 

Atlas Sound – Kid Klimax (19 plays)