☮ a r t m a k i n g ☮

P R A C T I C E + R E F E R E N C E S
I saw this photo yesterday at the Alex Colville exhibit at the AGO. Something about it is so striking. On the right is the Colville, looking out at his wife of 70 years, and beyond that, ocean. His wife, Rhoda, is the blonde figure that appears in his paintings. This image was probably taken in Nova Scotia, where they lived most of their lives. I find this image really meaningful.

I saw this photo yesterday at the Alex Colville exhibit at the AGO. Something about it is so striking. On the right is the Colville, looking out at his wife of 70 years, and beyond that, ocean. His wife, Rhoda, is the blonde figure that appears in his paintings. This image was probably taken in Nova Scotia, where they lived most of their lives. I find this image really meaningful.

via apartmenttherapy:

"George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) worked for the last 20 years of his life in a remarkably sophisticated writer’s hut on his property in St. Albans, Hertfordshire. Besides having electricity, a telephone, and a buzzer system, the hut’s most notable feature was that it was built on a turntable, which enabled Shaw to push it to follow the sun."

And even more drool-worthy, other famous writing huts including Henry David Thoreau’s at Walden, omg…

The first episode of Al Jazeera’s new series Rebel Architecture features Santiago Cirugeda, “a subversive architect from Seville who has dedicated his career to reclaiming urban spaces for the public.” In this episode we see a few projects, both legal and illegal, ugly and …promising, that Cirugeda and other architects / volunteers / artists / kids build. The episode is really well done, and such a relevant insight into the creative solutions and attitudes to the economic crisis in Spain. As one architect puts it, “Our projects are portrayed as the solution to the financial crisis, but we have to be clear on our position. This isn’t just a quick fix for the crisis but an alternative model.” Some really cool ideas in here.

The first episode of Al Jazeera’s new series Rebel Architecture features Santiago Cirugeda, “a subversive architect from Seville who has dedicated his career to reclaiming urban spaces for the public.” In this episode we see a few projects, both legal and illegal, ugly and …promising, that Cirugeda and other architects / volunteers / artists / kids build. The episode is really well done, and such a relevant insight into the creative solutions and attitudes to the economic crisis in Spain. As one architect puts it, “Our projects are portrayed as the solution to the financial crisis, but we have to be clear on our position. This isn’t just a quick fix for the crisis but an alternative model.” Some really cool ideas in here.

st. margaret’s bay, nova scotia.

self-controlled robots let you roam tate britain after dark
from designboom.com: ”…broadcasting live from tate britain beginning tonight, the public will be able to navigate the museum’s collection of historic art using self-controlled robots, which can roam through the gallery spaces and exhibition halls. …robots designed for late night travel can be guided and controlled by people all over the world through a web portal. every few minutes the robots choose new operators to drive them through galleries and exhibition spaces, designed and developed specifically for this task. navigating the site can be enacted with on-screen buttons or a keyboard’s arrows, which directs their motion either forwards or backwards. they can also look up and down, scanning the artworks on display. the robots have been created in collaboration with RAL space (working alongside the UK space agency)..” 

self-controlled robots let you roam tate britain after dark

from designboom.com: ”…broadcasting live from tate britain beginning tonight, the public will be able to navigate the museum’s collection of historic art using self-controlled robots, which can roam through the gallery spaces and exhibition halls. …robots designed for late night travel can be guided and controlled by people all over the world through a web portal. every few minutes the robots choose new operators to drive them through galleries and exhibition spaces, designed and developed specifically for this task. navigating the site can be enacted with on-screen buttons or a keyboard’s arrows, which directs their motion either forwards or backwards. they can also look up and down, scanning the artworks on display. the robots have been created in collaboration with RAL space (working alongside the UK space agency)..” 

Atlas Sound – Kid Klimax (24 plays)

nova scotia, tonight. about one hour apart.

last year the massachusetts museum of contemporary art (mass moca) held an exhibition called "oh, canada," a sort of review of contemporary canadian art. from what i’ve head, the gallery itself, in north adams, mass., is immense - galleries are former industrial buildings (26) that form a sort of factory complex. with that kind of space, it makes sense that 62 canadian artists, many of whom do installation work, could fit under one (complex of) roof(s). i recently caught one third of the show, as it has been split into three parts around the canadian maritimes. if you’re in sackville, moncton, or charlottetown, it’s definitely worth seeing. among the 62 artists: gisele amantea, dean baldwin, personal fav charles stankievich, and the all-really,-truly-excellent daniel barrow, shery boyle, david hoffos, graeme patterson, etienne zach, and MTL’s own patrick bernachez.

last year the massachusetts museum of contemporary art (mass moca) held an exhibition called "oh, canada," a sort of review of contemporary canadian art. from what i’ve head, the gallery itself, in north adams, mass., is immense - galleries are former industrial buildings (26) that form a sort of factory complex. with that kind of space, it makes sense that 62 canadian artists, many of whom do installation work, could fit under one (complex of) roof(s). 

i recently caught one third of the show, as it has been split into three parts around the canadian maritimes. if you’re in sackville, moncton, or charlottetown, it’s definitely worth seeing. among the 62 artists: gisele amantea, dean baldwin, personal fav charles stankievich, and the all-really,-truly-excellent daniel barrow, shery boyle, david hoffos, graeme patterson, etienne zach, and MTL’s own patrick bernachez.

segments of rachel carson’s beautiful, short essay “the marginal world.” (in full here) just read it yesterday at a friend’s house in nova scotia, across the road from the shoreline.

these towers look like silk when they fall. 0:32…

"…the question of what kind of city we want cannot be divorced from the question of what kind of people we want to be, what kinds of social relations we seek, what relations to nature we cherish, what style of daily life we desire, what kinds of technologies we deem appropriate, what aesthetic values we hold. The right to the city is, therefore, far more than a right of individual access to the resources that the city embodies: it is a right to change ourselves by changing the city more after our heart’s desire. It is, moreover, a collective rather than an individual right since changing the city inevitably depends upon the exercise of a collective power over the processes of urbanization. The freedom to make and remake ourselves and our cities is, I want to argue, one of the most precious yet most neglected of our human rights."
David Harvey, The Right to the City
I would like to know if anyone has a picture of David Harvey’s face / brain tattooed on their body, and if not, why not?

"Mound" by Allison Schulnik 2011.

Amazing.

a lovely piece by my friend marissa tombs. thanks marissa!

a lovely piece by my friend marissa tombs. thanks marissa!

a map of central toronto’s alleyways!
laneway housing is an interesting option to increase density in a city like toronto, without building up. right now the concept is more of a boutique architecture solution, but in other cities with more flexible regulations laneway housing can be an affordable prospect and housing solution. and could be in toronto, too!
coming up this friday, fittingly: 
Rear View (Projects) is pleased to present Flipping Properties, a project by Jimenez Lai in Toronto during Summer 2014.
Flipping Properties was commissioned by Rear View (Projects) for an unconventional exhibition platform – a laneway in Toronto’s Little Portugal neighbourhood. The project is a continuation of an ongoing study of super-furnitures by Lai, an architect, and the team of Bureau Spectacular. The installation takes the familiar house icon, the pentagon, as its formal starting point. Lai denatures this symbol of domesticity, converting it into super-furniture which is ‘too big to be furniture and too small to be architecture.’ This intervention in Toronto’s urban fabric provokes us to reconsider the potential uses for overlooked spaces in the city and question typical modes of interaction between art, place and audiences.” July 11 – September 14, 2014. The laneway at Sheridan Avenue & Gordon Street, Toronto.

a map of central toronto’s alleyways!

laneway housing is an interesting option to increase density in a city like toronto, without building up. right now the concept is more of a boutique architecture solution, but in other cities with more flexible regulations laneway housing can be an affordable prospect and housing solution. and could be in toronto, too!

coming up this friday, fittingly: 

Rear View (Projects) is pleased to present Flipping Properties, a project by Jimenez Lai in Toronto during Summer 2014.

Flipping Properties was commissioned by Rear View (Projects) for an unconventional exhibition platform – a laneway in Toronto’s Little Portugal neighbourhood. The project is a continuation of an ongoing study of super-furnitures by Lai, an architect, and the team of Bureau Spectacular. The installation takes the familiar house icon, the pentagon, as its formal starting point. Lai denatures this symbol of domesticity, converting it into super-furniture which is ‘too big to be furniture and too small to be architecture.’ This intervention in Toronto’s urban fabric provokes us to reconsider the potential uses for overlooked spaces in the city and question typical modes of interaction between art, place and audiences.” 

July 11 – September 14, 2014. The laneway at Sheridan Avenue & Gordon Street, Toronto.